Daisy-May Hudson

Director / Producer

 

Daisy-May Hudson is a documentary director/producer who was awarded BAFTA’s Breakthrough Brit as well as a BRITDOC/DOC SOCIETY fellow. Having never made a film before, Daisy’s journey into the industry is an unconventional one, when she began filming her experience of being homeless with her family as a coping mechanism. After being re-housed, along with Half Way’s three other producers, turned the footage into feature documentary Half Way (2016) which has received critical acclaim, an extended cinema run, national press coverage with four/five star reviews and has recently been nominated for the Grierson award for Best Cinema Documentary as well as best documentary at the British Independent Film Awards.

Whilst living in the hostel, Daisy began working at VICE UK as an intern. Shortly after joining, she climbed the ranks to become a core member of the team where she produced and directed documentaries for three years. Her directorial debut at VICE Inside the Superhuman world of the Iceman, was nominated for a Lovie Award and received international press coverage. Daisy has a keen eye for observational documentary and values the great responsibility of storytelling and the impact this has on political and social narratives. 

Daisy recently produced a series for BBC2 with KEO films exploring in-work poverty. Daisy is dedicated and passionate about driving change in representation of working class people in documentary, film and politics. She believes supporting working class filmmakers is vital for the future of the industry. She is excited about growing Beehive Films with three brilliant women. Daisy is currently developing her next feature doc as well as writing her first feature fiction following the same themes.

Since becoming homeless in 2013, Daisy has been involved in housing activism and is now
considered somewhat of an expert on the housing crisis speaking as a guest with Jon Snow on Channel 4 as well as BBC and ITV news. Daisy has written for publications such as The Times, Guardian, The Independent, The Debrief and VICE and has spoken on various panels with Diane Abbott and Simon Jenkins. Profiled in i-D as one of the year’s most influential young activists and Huck Magazine’s People of the Year 2016’, it's this kind of coverage that's testament to the resonance Daisy';s story has had.

 


Alice Hughes

Producer

Alice Hughes is a filmmaker and producer, who's experience includes producing and directing branded content, music videos, TVC's and documentary. In 2015, she graduated with a distinction in an MA in Ethnographic and Documentary Film at UCL and in the same year she co-founded Beehive Films. HALF WAY is their first feature.

Alice hopes to continue a career in producing and directing creative and innovative content that aims to expose and uncover the experiences of those on the margins of society. 


Claire O'Neill

Producer

 

 

 

 

 

Thea Paulett

Co-producer

Claire O'Neill spent three years in publishing as an acquiring editor and business affairs manager for audio entertainment company, Audible. In 2017, she was awarded London Book Fair's Trailblazer Under 30 Award for her work in promoting audio and dedication to acquiring a broad range of rights. Claire has experience in producing and directing theatre. In 2015 she collaborated with Master of None to produce Foxfinder at Edinburgh Fringe with 5* reviews and sell-out shows.

 

Currently, Claire is a producer at MOFILM where she works with filmmakers and brands from all over the world to make documentaries, video content and web series. She co-founded Beehive Films in 2015, HALF WAY is their first feature documentary. 

 

Since 2015 Thea Paulett has been the Development Assistant at leading UK production house, Working Title Films and personally assists the Head of Film and Creative at the company. HALF WAY is the second film she has produced, after a six minute short by James William Blades, named ‘The Buffer Zone’.

Since graduating, Thea has worked for a number of highly renowned film production companies, including Number 9 Films, as well as working at top film sales companies including HanWay Films and Cornerstone Films. She co-founded Beehive Films Ltd
with fellow producers in early 2015. Thea hopes to continue a career in film development and producing and looks forward to successfully launching Beehive Films along with the rest of the Half Way team.



Vera Simmonds

Editor

Vera began her editing career as an artist-filmmaker. She then spent several years working in television before completing a Masters in Editing at the National Film and Television School. During this time she edited Tim Knights’ short documentary Love Me Tender, which was selected for Sheffield DocFest and shortlisted for a Grierson Award, and Daisy Jacobs’ short animation The Bigger Picture, which was nominated for an Oscar, and won the 2015 BAFTA for Best Short Animation.

Since then she has gone on to edit several independent feature documentaries; Tierra Caliente about the Mexican war on drugs, Half Way about the British housing crisis – which was nominated for Best Cinema Documentary at the 2017 Grierson Awards, and most recently Hermanos, a film about illegal immigration between Mexico and the United States, set against the backdrop of the 2016 Presidential race. Her television work includes an episode of Life and Death Row for BBC Three.


James Smith

Music / Composer

James Smith is a film and television composer based in London. He graduated from Leeds College of Music studying composition with Brian Morrell. Last year he was accepted into the Royal College of Music where he received the South Square Trust Scholarship Award and is currently studying a Master’s Degree in Composition for Screen.

James has been involved in many different projects, from short films to documentaries, as well as producing songs for various artists. Most recently he has completed the filming of his first short-film, ‘The Buffer Zone’, which will be entirely set to his own original score. As both the director and composer, this experience allowed James to gain a deeper understanding of the connection between the pictures and music.